ACCURACY

by

$23.00

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The Blurb

The performer places a one dollar bill and a one hundred dollar bill on the table along with a quarter. The spectator is asked to spin the quarter on the table while the performer’s back is turned.

When the quarter comes to rest the spectator is asked to remember which side is up. The spectator places the magician’s wallet over the quarter so it is completely hidden. Next the spectator is asked to hide one bill in each hand. All this is done while the performer’s back is turned.

The performer turns around and removes 3 business cards from his pocket. He writes down something on each one and places one in front of each of the spectator’s hands and one in front of the wallet.

From this point the spectator opens his hands, revealing which bill is in which hand and THEY turn over the business cards proving both correct! But wait… remember the quarter? The spectator lifts the wallet revealing the quarter landed heads side up. Again THEY turn over the business card revealing the words “Heads Side Up.”

This is ACCURACY.

Key points:

  • No electronics
  • Spectator may keep everything (if you can afford to give away 101 dollars!)
  • No assistants
  • No one ahead
  • Nothing added or taken away
  • No peeking
  • Perfect for walk around
  • Bonus: Andrew Gerard shares his notes on this routine, offers a stage idea, and a killer repeat.

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My Comments

This six-page manuscript details this very clever routine. The key points that are mentioned are accurate.  The only thing not mentioned is that there is some preparation to the materials you'll be using, but the preparation is not difficult and shouldn't take too long.  And, once prepared, you can carry these items very easily in your wallet and pockets and be ready to go anytime.  Also, the need for a $100 is only for dramatic purposes.  You can certainly use a smaller denomination if you wish.  If you give away some or all of the materials at the end, then obviously you'll have to prepare quite a few sets (which is the way Andrew Gerard writes that he does).